Technics SL-1200G Turntable

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Technics SL-1200G Turntable

Technics SL-1200G Turntable


Not available online, please call to order.
210-805-9927

Technics SL-1200G Turntable


Not available online, please call to order.
210-805-9927


  • Product Ratings (No Rating)

    Average Rating
    43211

    Choose How Many Stars (5 Being the best)

  • Description


     

    MY TAKE: From any perspective, this is a wonderful turntable. Sound, construction, reliability, you name it, the Technics SL-1200G impresses. If you are looking to a fuss-free, super-sounding analog rig, you simply can't go wrong! Let us pre mount a cartridge for a virtually plug-and-play analog experience.. - Galen Carol


    Be sure to check out Michael Fremer's post comparing the Technics SL1200G to the $120,000+ Caliburn Turntable with SAT Tonearm - See if you can hear the difference!

     

    The last version of the SL-1200 was released in Japan back in 2008 and the model has been sorely missed. Technics has announced the successor in the form Grand Class Technics SL-1200G and the Limited Edition Grand Class SL-1200GAE.
     

    The ubiquitous form factor remains essentially unchanged, but Technics have made a raft of notable upgrades - this is not your old SL1200!
     

    Coreless Direct Drive Motor -

    Conventional analog turntables have problems with degradation in sound quality caused by factors such as minute speed vibration during rotation and rotation irregularity called "cogging." In the SL-1200G, the use of a newly developed coreless direct-drive motor with no iron core eliminates cogging. Also, the twin-rotor construction reduces the bearing load while maintaining high torque and also reduces minute vibration during rotation. These factors enable reproduction of the warm, exquisitely detailed sound etched on analog records.

    High-precision Motor Control Technology -

    The application of motor control technology developed for Blu-ray devices and switching the drive mode depending on the operational status of the motor achieve a high-starting torque and high-speed stability.

    Three-layered Turntable Platter -

    The turntable has a three-layered construction with a rigidly combined brass and aluminium die-cast platter. With a deadening rubber covering its entire rear surface to eliminate unnecessary resonance, thereby achieving high rigidity and vibration damping. This delivers smooth rotational stability and inertial mass surpassing the SP-10MK2, the direct-drive turntable standard used by broadcast stations worldwide, as well as having more than twice the inertial mass of the SL-1200MK5.

    Ultra-Accurate Platter Balancing -

    When the weight distribution of the turntable is uneven, excess vibration or noise occurs during rotation, which causes degradation in sound quality. Therefore, the balance of the turntable is adjusted at the factory by using specialized high-precision balance adjustment equipment for each and every item after the turntable is assembled. Turntables that have undergone adjustment are labelled with a sticker reading "BALANCED" to indicate that adjustment has been done.

     

    Precision Tonearm -

    The tonearm employs lightweight magnesium which has a high damping effect, with cold drawing improving the characteristics of the material and achieving the high-precision required. In addition, high initial-motion sensitivity is attained by employing the traditional Technics gimbal suspension construction with horizontal rotation axis and the vertical rotation axis intersecting at a single central point, as well as high-precision bearings using a cut-processed housing.

    Four-layer Chassis Construction -

    A precision-machined, 10-mm-thick aluminum deck plate has been added to the previous three-layered construction of aluminum die-cast, BMC, and heavyweight-class rubber on the SL-1200MK5. This four-layered construction combines high rigidity with a high-quality finish and feel.

     

    Technics developed a new coreless direct-drive motor that’s lacking the iron core that’s often the cause of those speed fluctuations in the platter. And any remaining vibrations from the turntable’s electric motor are further suppressed and corrected using new processor-controlled rotational positioning sensors inside the SL-1200G’s housing. The deck plate/main chassis has been significantly beefed-up with a total weight now at 18 kg. New isolation footers and upgraded plinth further reduce the influence of external structure-borne vibration. The platter is now a three-layer affair comprised of differing materials for increased damping and higher mass. Each platter is individually balanced for optimum rotational stability.


    CUSTOMER REVIEW:

    "I've had the pleasure of listening to the GAE for the past 3 days and I have to say that it is an incredibly impressive table. I've owned a Technics SL-1200 M3D for over 15 years as my main table, then went to a Rega RP40 and recently upgraded to a VPI Scout 1.1 with an Ortofon 2m black in 2015, for reference. The GAE took the place of the VPI and I swapped over the 2m Black, which still has plenty of life left. The rest of my system consists of a Hagerman Bugle 2 phono pre, Rogue Cronus Magnum II amp powering a set of Kef LS50.
     

    "I'm not an obsessive audiophile (no thousand dollar cables or whatever) but I enjoy good sound. The GAE is an obvious cut above the VPI scout and a night and day difference from the existing 1200M3D.
     

    "The table is dead quiet all throughout the entire volume range (VPI would have a low level static hum at around 40%) and is just incredibly quiet throughout. The music comes alive from an inky black background, and the soundstage/imaging and dynamics is the best I have heard; maybe due to the new motor design and speed stability. I am very familiar with how the 1200M3D sounds stock (kind of dark) and this sounds nothing like that. It has breathed new life into every record I own and it truly gives off the effect of "being there" on any remotely decent mastered record. Ryan Adams - Live at Carnegie Hall sounds like you are sitting front row, capturing the ambience and space of the performance like I have never heard.
     

    "This table simply does everything I liked about the VPI (wide open soundstage, detail, clarity) and does it even better than I expected. All the buttons, knobs and sliders have this excellent tactile feel and the platter will spin by itself for maybe 20-30 seconds with the slightest push, which I found to be pretty amazing. I can say without a doubt that this is the quietest table I've ever listened to, the noise floor is so low that I actually checked to see if the amp was turned on while the needle was still on the lead in groove. The motor makes zero audible noise when starting/stopping/spinning the platter - the table is entirely silent.
     

    "Build quality wise it's on a level of its own. The fit and finish is reminiscent more of a high end Swiss watch than a turntable - it feels like it's worth it's price tag. The polished strobe dots, brass platter and polished aluminum top plate look stunning.
     

    "Just wanted to share my thoughts with you Galen, thanks again for the top notch service and I truly appreciate you setting up the table and cartridge for me." - W. L.

     

    REVIEWS:

    Stereophile: Description: The instant I first saw and touched the Grand Class SL-1200GAE 50th Anniversary Limited Edition, I realized that it is not just a tarting-up of the old workhorse SL-1200. New from the ground up, it has almost nothing in common with the used SL-1200 Mk.2 I bought at a stoop sale for $70.
     

    Every time I'm near the shiny new 'GAE, I run my fingers sensually over the word TECHNICS deeply engraved on the hairline-processed, 0.375"-thick aluminum top plate of its plinth. This new fourth layer is added to the already substantial three-layer sandwich of die-cast aluminum, bulk molding compound, and heavy rubber of the SL-1200 Mk.5's plinth. No MDF anywhere! The new 'table weighs 39.6 lbs (18kg). The discontinued SP-1200 Mk.5 weighed 26.4 lbs (12kg).
     

    If the new platter, motor, and speed control are unquestionably big steps up from the original, so are the new isolation feet, made of heavy die-cast zinc, with a flexible leg of dense silicone separating the zinc feet from their mounting screws. The new feet allow the deck to move freely in three dimensions. Tetsuya Itani says that his goal was a full-table resonant frequency lower than 10Hz.
     

    My favorite part of the original SL-1200 was its thick rubber platter mat, which delivered the full boogie energy of every song. Fortunately, Technics has not changed that. Also unchanged from the SL-1200s of legend are the overall look and layout, the Pitch slider—although pitch control is now fully digital—the Off/On and Start/Stop switches, and the 45rpm adapter. Unlike the old 1200s, the back of the SL-1200GAE has an IEC power-cord socket, and gold-plated RCAs with solid-brass grounding lugs for fitting the tonearm cable of your choice.
     

    My biggest problem with the original SL-1200 was its aluminum tonearm. Compared to audiophile arms, it felt flimsy and imprecise, and favored high-compliance moving-magnet cartridges. (Moving-coil cartridges can overwhelm flimsy tonearms.) The new tonearm has an effective mass of 12gm, low friction, stainless-steel gimbal bearings, and a strong, light, highly damped armtube made of cold-drawn magnesium. It feels very precise, and seems better suited for the lower-compliance moving-coils favored by audiophiles. To accommodate heavy cartridges, the 'GAE tonearm comes with two extra balance weights, so the user has a choice of small, medium, and large.
     

    Listening: The world's best record-players all exhibit an eerie silence coupled to a precise, palpable, and captivating spatiality—which is what we pay so much extra for. By comparison, my stoop-sale Technics SL-1200 Mk.2 is conspicuously noisy and spatially vague. The reconceived 1200, the new Grand Class SL-1200GAE, with its new motor-drive system, went a surprisingly long way toward correcting these problems.
     

    I used four cartridges with the Technics: an Ortofon 2M Black MM, a Hana by Excel EL low-output MC, my Zu Denon DL-103 MC, and a mono-wired Shure M44 MM with 78rpm stylus. My listening notes look like this: "SILENCE, PRECISION, SILENCE, mucho dynamics, easy by nature, expansive, SPATIAL CORRECTNESS, tiny info/detail, jump & jive, quieter and FIRMER than the old 1200! BOOGIE oogie WOOGIE and Smoooooth!"
     

    Quiet, lively, and precise accurately describe how the Technics SL-1200GAE played records. With every cartridge, the 'GAE's octave-to-octave energy balance felt even and authentic.
     

    Energy-wise, the SL-1200GAE made my newly beloved Linn LP12 with Valhalla power supply feel uneven, a bit out of control (especially in the lower octaves), and possibly a tad vapid. (Linn's Lingo power supply and Cirkus platter-bearing and subchassis upgrades would likely cancel those disparities.) To my surprise, rhythm, melody, and bass lines were more easily noticed and enjoyable to follow with the Technics. As I trolled through my Mango, Island, and Studio One records, I realized that the SL-1200GAE was beating my Linn Sondek LP12 at its own game: It had major force factor and foot-stomping momentum—perhaps the best I've ever experienced. The 'GAE captured the urgency of Miles Davis, the potency of Junior Wells, and the inspired delirium of Roy Acuff singing Hank Williams's "I Saw the Light," from the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band's Will the Circle Be Unbroken (3 LPs, United Artists UAS-9801).
     

    Music played on the Technics was better organized, easier to comprehend. The SL-1200GAE did an especially good job of describing full orchestras. Because it reproduced, without blurring, the dynamic spreads of notes and instruments, from silence to full-on drive and swing, it made piano concertos seem less confused and overwrought than they sometimes do.
     

    Mes trois conclusions: I'll be writing a Follow-Up about the Technics Grand Class SL-1200GAE 50th Anniversary Limited Edition in which I'll delve more deeply into the musical vicissitudes of this shiny new machine. For now, I'll answer three questions about it: Is the SL-1200GAE better than its legendary predecessors? The SL-1200GAE was so quiet, precise, and forceful that it made my old SL-1200 Mk.2 feel and sound almost like a toy. It played with substantially more detail, dynamics, and musical authority than either the SL-1200 Mk.2 or Pioneer's PLX-1000 ($699).
     

    Is the SL-1200GAE an audiophile-quality turntable that can compete in a high-end audio marketplace filled with scores of quality contenders costing less than $5000? I believe that it is. It did all the audiophile tricks—especially low noise, precise imaging, midrange clarity, bass punch, and openness of the high frequencies—and it out-boogied them all.
     

    Is the SL-1200GAE worth $4000? Unquestionably. Its materials and build quality are superb, and, to my taste and experience, it played records as well as or better than any turntable listed in Class B of Stereophile's "Recommended Components." - Herb Reichert, Stereophile


    FEATURES:

    • All New Core-Less, Twin-Rotor High Torque Direct Drive Motor - Eliminates cogging and insures smooth rotation
    • Magnesium Tonearm Armtube - Provides Rigidity, damping and strength
    • Three-layer Platter - Consisting of brass, aluminum and vibration damping virtually eliminates resonance
    • Four-Layer Plinth - Rigid aluminum deckplate combines with diecast aluminum, BMC and heavyweight rubber damp vibration
    • All New Motor Controller - For exacting speed
    • Isolator Feet - Unique footers dramatically reduce structure-borne vibration
    • Built-In Cueing Light
    • Built-In Stroboscope

     

    SPEED ACCURACY:

     

    Measurements by Stereophile Magazine - The SL-1200GAE has some of the best speed accuracy as any turntable reviewed on their pages.
     

    Fig.1 Technics SL-1200GAE, speed stability data.

    Fig.2 Technics SL-1200GAE, speed stability (raw frequency yellow; low-pass filtered frequency green). The explanation is rather complex but what is being communicated is that the SL-1200GAE has some of the best speed accuracy (a stable continuous green line) as any turntable reviewed on their pages.
     

    SPECIFICATIONS:

    Turntable section -

    • Type: Direct Drive Manual Turntable
    • Turntable Speeds: 33 1/3, 45, 78 rpm
    • Adjust Range: ±8%, ±16%
    • Starting Torque: 3.3 kg・cm (2.8 lb-in)
    • Build-up Characteristics: 0.7 s. from standstill to 33 1/3 r/min
    • Wow and Flutter: 0.025% W.R.M.S. (JIS C5521)
    • Rumble - 78dB (IEC 98A Weighted)
    • Turntable Platter: Brass and Aluminum diecast combined
    • Diameter: 32mm (13-5/64")
    • Weight: 3.6kg (7 15/16 lb) (Including rubber sheet)

    Tonearm Section -

    • Type: Universal Static Balance
    • Effective Length: 230mm (9-1/16")
    • Overhang: 15mm (19/32")
    • Tracking Error Angle: Within 2° 32' (at the outer groove of 30cm(12") record), within 0° 32' (at the inner groove of 30cm(12") record)
    • Offset Angle: 22°
    • Arm-height Adjustment Range: 0 - 6 mm
    • Stylus Pressure Adjustment Range: 0 - 4 g (direct reading)
    • Head Shell Weight: Approx. 7.6 g
    • Applicable Cartridge Weight Range: (without auxiliary weight) 5.6 - 12.0g, 14.3 - 20.7g (including headshell) (with small auxiliary weight) 10.0 - 16.4g 18.7 - 25.1g (including headshell) (with large auxiliary weight) 14.3 - 19.8g 23.0 - 28.5g (including headshell)
    • Cartridge Mounting Dimension: JIS 12.7 mm Interval
    • Head Shell Terminal Lug: 1.2 mm φ 4-pin Terminal Lug

    Terminals -

    • Audio Output: PHONO (Pin Jack) x 1 EARTH TERMINAL x 1

    General -

    • Power Supply: AC120 V, 60 Hz
    • Power Consumption: 14 W Approx. 0.2W (Standby)
    • Dimensions: (W x H x D)453 x 173 x 372 mm 17-27/32 x 6-13/16 x 14-21/32 inch
    • Weight: Approx. 18 kg
    • Approx. 39.7lbs
    • Accessories: Turntable, Turntable sheet, Dust cover, EP record adaptor, Balance weight, Auxiliary weight(S), Auxiliary weight(L), Head shell, Overhang gauge, Screw set for cartridge, PHONO cable, PHONO earth lead, AC power supply cord, Screw set for turntable, Owner's Manual

     

    Technics Direct Drive Turntables Introduction

     

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Product Ratings

Average Rating
43211

Choose How Many Stars (5 Being the best)

Technics SL-1200G Turntable


Not available online, please call to order.
210-805-9927


Description


 

MY TAKE: From any perspective, this is a wonderful turntable. Sound, construction, reliability, you name it, the Technics SL-1200G impresses. If you are looking to a fuss-free, super-sounding analog rig, you simply can't go wrong! Let us pre mount a cartridge for a virtually plug-and-play analog experience.. - Galen Carol


Be sure to check out Michael Fremer's post comparing the Technics SL1200G to the $120,000+ Caliburn Turntable with SAT Tonearm - See if you can hear the difference!

 

The last version of the SL-1200 was released in Japan back in 2008 and the model has been sorely missed. Technics has announced the successor in the form Grand Class Technics SL-1200G and the Limited Edition Grand Class SL-1200GAE.
 

The ubiquitous form factor remains essentially unchanged, but Technics have made a raft of notable upgrades - this is not your old SL1200!
 

Coreless Direct Drive Motor -

Conventional analog turntables have problems with degradation in sound quality caused by factors such as minute speed vibration during rotation and rotation irregularity called "cogging." In the SL-1200G, the use of a newly developed coreless direct-drive motor with no iron core eliminates cogging. Also, the twin-rotor construction reduces the bearing load while maintaining high torque and also reduces minute vibration during rotation. These factors enable reproduction of the warm, exquisitely detailed sound etched on analog records.

High-precision Motor Control Technology -

The application of motor control technology developed for Blu-ray devices and switching the drive mode depending on the operational status of the motor achieve a high-starting torque and high-speed stability.

Three-layered Turntable Platter -

The turntable has a three-layered construction with a rigidly combined brass and aluminium die-cast platter. With a deadening rubber covering its entire rear surface to eliminate unnecessary resonance, thereby achieving high rigidity and vibration damping. This delivers smooth rotational stability and inertial mass surpassing the SP-10MK2, the direct-drive turntable standard used by broadcast stations worldwide, as well as having more than twice the inertial mass of the SL-1200MK5.

Ultra-Accurate Platter Balancing -

When the weight distribution of the turntable is uneven, excess vibration or noise occurs during rotation, which causes degradation in sound quality. Therefore, the balance of the turntable is adjusted at the factory by using specialized high-precision balance adjustment equipment for each and every item after the turntable is assembled. Turntables that have undergone adjustment are labelled with a sticker reading "BALANCED" to indicate that adjustment has been done.

 

Precision Tonearm -

The tonearm employs lightweight magnesium which has a high damping effect, with cold drawing improving the characteristics of the material and achieving the high-precision required. In addition, high initial-motion sensitivity is attained by employing the traditional Technics gimbal suspension construction with horizontal rotation axis and the vertical rotation axis intersecting at a single central point, as well as high-precision bearings using a cut-processed housing.

Four-layer Chassis Construction -

A precision-machined, 10-mm-thick aluminum deck plate has been added to the previous three-layered construction of aluminum die-cast, BMC, and heavyweight-class rubber on the SL-1200MK5. This four-layered construction combines high rigidity with a high-quality finish and feel.

 

Technics developed a new coreless direct-drive motor that’s lacking the iron core that’s often the cause of those speed fluctuations in the platter. And any remaining vibrations from the turntable’s electric motor are further suppressed and corrected using new processor-controlled rotational positioning sensors inside the SL-1200G’s housing. The deck plate/main chassis has been significantly beefed-up with a total weight now at 18 kg. New isolation footers and upgraded plinth further reduce the influence of external structure-borne vibration. The platter is now a three-layer affair comprised of differing materials for increased damping and higher mass. Each platter is individually balanced for optimum rotational stability.


CUSTOMER REVIEW:

"I've had the pleasure of listening to the GAE for the past 3 days and I have to say that it is an incredibly impressive table. I've owned a Technics SL-1200 M3D for over 15 years as my main table, then went to a Rega RP40 and recently upgraded to a VPI Scout 1.1 with an Ortofon 2m black in 2015, for reference. The GAE took the place of the VPI and I swapped over the 2m Black, which still has plenty of life left. The rest of my system consists of a Hagerman Bugle 2 phono pre, Rogue Cronus Magnum II amp powering a set of Kef LS50.
 

"I'm not an obsessive audiophile (no thousand dollar cables or whatever) but I enjoy good sound. The GAE is an obvious cut above the VPI scout and a night and day difference from the existing 1200M3D.
 

"The table is dead quiet all throughout the entire volume range (VPI would have a low level static hum at around 40%) and is just incredibly quiet throughout. The music comes alive from an inky black background, and the soundstage/imaging and dynamics is the best I have heard; maybe due to the new motor design and speed stability. I am very familiar with how the 1200M3D sounds stock (kind of dark) and this sounds nothing like that. It has breathed new life into every record I own and it truly gives off the effect of "being there" on any remotely decent mastered record. Ryan Adams - Live at Carnegie Hall sounds like you are sitting front row, capturing the ambience and space of the performance like I have never heard.
 

"This table simply does everything I liked about the VPI (wide open soundstage, detail, clarity) and does it even better than I expected. All the buttons, knobs and sliders have this excellent tactile feel and the platter will spin by itself for maybe 20-30 seconds with the slightest push, which I found to be pretty amazing. I can say without a doubt that this is the quietest table I've ever listened to, the noise floor is so low that I actually checked to see if the amp was turned on while the needle was still on the lead in groove. The motor makes zero audible noise when starting/stopping/spinning the platter - the table is entirely silent.
 

"Build quality wise it's on a level of its own. The fit and finish is reminiscent more of a high end Swiss watch than a turntable - it feels like it's worth it's price tag. The polished strobe dots, brass platter and polished aluminum top plate look stunning.
 

"Just wanted to share my thoughts with you Galen, thanks again for the top notch service and I truly appreciate you setting up the table and cartridge for me." - W. L.

 

REVIEWS:

Stereophile: Description: The instant I first saw and touched the Grand Class SL-1200GAE 50th Anniversary Limited Edition, I realized that it is not just a tarting-up of the old workhorse SL-1200. New from the ground up, it has almost nothing in common with the used SL-1200 Mk.2 I bought at a stoop sale for $70.
 

Every time I'm near the shiny new 'GAE, I run my fingers sensually over the word TECHNICS deeply engraved on the hairline-processed, 0.375"-thick aluminum top plate of its plinth. This new fourth layer is added to the already substantial three-layer sandwich of die-cast aluminum, bulk molding compound, and heavy rubber of the SL-1200 Mk.5's plinth. No MDF anywhere! The new 'table weighs 39.6 lbs (18kg). The discontinued SP-1200 Mk.5 weighed 26.4 lbs (12kg).
 

If the new platter, motor, and speed control are unquestionably big steps up from the original, so are the new isolation feet, made of heavy die-cast zinc, with a flexible leg of dense silicone separating the zinc feet from their mounting screws. The new feet allow the deck to move freely in three dimensions. Tetsuya Itani says that his goal was a full-table resonant frequency lower than 10Hz.
 

My favorite part of the original SL-1200 was its thick rubber platter mat, which delivered the full boogie energy of every song. Fortunately, Technics has not changed that. Also unchanged from the SL-1200s of legend are the overall look and layout, the Pitch slider—although pitch control is now fully digital—the Off/On and Start/Stop switches, and the 45rpm adapter. Unlike the old 1200s, the back of the SL-1200GAE has an IEC power-cord socket, and gold-plated RCAs with solid-brass grounding lugs for fitting the tonearm cable of your choice.
 

My biggest problem with the original SL-1200 was its aluminum tonearm. Compared to audiophile arms, it felt flimsy and imprecise, and favored high-compliance moving-magnet cartridges. (Moving-coil cartridges can overwhelm flimsy tonearms.) The new tonearm has an effective mass of 12gm, low friction, stainless-steel gimbal bearings, and a strong, light, highly damped armtube made of cold-drawn magnesium. It feels very precise, and seems better suited for the lower-compliance moving-coils favored by audiophiles. To accommodate heavy cartridges, the 'GAE tonearm comes with two extra balance weights, so the user has a choice of small, medium, and large.
 

Listening: The world's best record-players all exhibit an eerie silence coupled to a precise, palpable, and captivating spatiality—which is what we pay so much extra for. By comparison, my stoop-sale Technics SL-1200 Mk.2 is conspicuously noisy and spatially vague. The reconceived 1200, the new Grand Class SL-1200GAE, with its new motor-drive system, went a surprisingly long way toward correcting these problems.
 

I used four cartridges with the Technics: an Ortofon 2M Black MM, a Hana by Excel EL low-output MC, my Zu Denon DL-103 MC, and a mono-wired Shure M44 MM with 78rpm stylus. My listening notes look like this: "SILENCE, PRECISION, SILENCE, mucho dynamics, easy by nature, expansive, SPATIAL CORRECTNESS, tiny info/detail, jump & jive, quieter and FIRMER than the old 1200! BOOGIE oogie WOOGIE and Smoooooth!"
 

Quiet, lively, and precise accurately describe how the Technics SL-1200GAE played records. With every cartridge, the 'GAE's octave-to-octave energy balance felt even and authentic.
 

Energy-wise, the SL-1200GAE made my newly beloved Linn LP12 with Valhalla power supply feel uneven, a bit out of control (especially in the lower octaves), and possibly a tad vapid. (Linn's Lingo power supply and Cirkus platter-bearing and subchassis upgrades would likely cancel those disparities.) To my surprise, rhythm, melody, and bass lines were more easily noticed and enjoyable to follow with the Technics. As I trolled through my Mango, Island, and Studio One records, I realized that the SL-1200GAE was beating my Linn Sondek LP12 at its own game: It had major force factor and foot-stomping momentum—perhaps the best I've ever experienced. The 'GAE captured the urgency of Miles Davis, the potency of Junior Wells, and the inspired delirium of Roy Acuff singing Hank Williams's "I Saw the Light," from the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band's Will the Circle Be Unbroken (3 LPs, United Artists UAS-9801).
 

Music played on the Technics was better organized, easier to comprehend. The SL-1200GAE did an especially good job of describing full orchestras. Because it reproduced, without blurring, the dynamic spreads of notes and instruments, from silence to full-on drive and swing, it made piano concertos seem less confused and overwrought than they sometimes do.
 

Mes trois conclusions: I'll be writing a Follow-Up about the Technics Grand Class SL-1200GAE 50th Anniversary Limited Edition in which I'll delve more deeply into the musical vicissitudes of this shiny new machine. For now, I'll answer three questions about it: Is the SL-1200GAE better than its legendary predecessors? The SL-1200GAE was so quiet, precise, and forceful that it made my old SL-1200 Mk.2 feel and sound almost like a toy. It played with substantially more detail, dynamics, and musical authority than either the SL-1200 Mk.2 or Pioneer's PLX-1000 ($699).
 

Is the SL-1200GAE an audiophile-quality turntable that can compete in a high-end audio marketplace filled with scores of quality contenders costing less than $5000? I believe that it is. It did all the audiophile tricks—especially low noise, precise imaging, midrange clarity, bass punch, and openness of the high frequencies—and it out-boogied them all.
 

Is the SL-1200GAE worth $4000? Unquestionably. Its materials and build quality are superb, and, to my taste and experience, it played records as well as or better than any turntable listed in Class B of Stereophile's "Recommended Components." - Herb Reichert, Stereophile


FEATURES:

  • All New Core-Less, Twin-Rotor High Torque Direct Drive Motor - Eliminates cogging and insures smooth rotation
  • Magnesium Tonearm Armtube - Provides Rigidity, damping and strength
  • Three-layer Platter - Consisting of brass, aluminum and vibration damping virtually eliminates resonance
  • Four-Layer Plinth - Rigid aluminum deckplate combines with diecast aluminum, BMC and heavyweight rubber damp vibration
  • All New Motor Controller - For exacting speed
  • Isolator Feet - Unique footers dramatically reduce structure-borne vibration
  • Built-In Cueing Light
  • Built-In Stroboscope

 

SPEED ACCURACY:

 

Measurements by Stereophile Magazine - The SL-1200GAE has some of the best speed accuracy as any turntable reviewed on their pages.
 

Fig.1 Technics SL-1200GAE, speed stability data.

Fig.2 Technics SL-1200GAE, speed stability (raw frequency yellow; low-pass filtered frequency green). The explanation is rather complex but what is being communicated is that the SL-1200GAE has some of the best speed accuracy (a stable continuous green line) as any turntable reviewed on their pages.
 

SPECIFICATIONS:

Turntable section -

  • Type: Direct Drive Manual Turntable
  • Turntable Speeds: 33 1/3, 45, 78 rpm
  • Adjust Range: ±8%, ±16%
  • Starting Torque: 3.3 kg・cm (2.8 lb-in)
  • Build-up Characteristics: 0.7 s. from standstill to 33 1/3 r/min
  • Wow and Flutter: 0.025% W.R.M.S. (JIS C5521)
  • Rumble - 78dB (IEC 98A Weighted)
  • Turntable Platter: Brass and Aluminum diecast combined
  • Diameter: 32mm (13-5/64")
  • Weight: 3.6kg (7 15/16 lb) (Including rubber sheet)

Tonearm Section -

  • Type: Universal Static Balance
  • Effective Length: 230mm (9-1/16")
  • Overhang: 15mm (19/32")
  • Tracking Error Angle: Within 2° 32' (at the outer groove of 30cm(12") record), within 0° 32' (at the inner groove of 30cm(12") record)
  • Offset Angle: 22°
  • Arm-height Adjustment Range: 0 - 6 mm
  • Stylus Pressure Adjustment Range: 0 - 4 g (direct reading)
  • Head Shell Weight: Approx. 7.6 g
  • Applicable Cartridge Weight Range: (without auxiliary weight) 5.6 - 12.0g, 14.3 - 20.7g (including headshell) (with small auxiliary weight) 10.0 - 16.4g 18.7 - 25.1g (including headshell) (with large auxiliary weight) 14.3 - 19.8g 23.0 - 28.5g (including headshell)
  • Cartridge Mounting Dimension: JIS 12.7 mm Interval
  • Head Shell Terminal Lug: 1.2 mm φ 4-pin Terminal Lug

Terminals -

  • Audio Output: PHONO (Pin Jack) x 1 EARTH TERMINAL x 1

General -

  • Power Supply: AC120 V, 60 Hz
  • Power Consumption: 14 W Approx. 0.2W (Standby)
  • Dimensions: (W x H x D)453 x 173 x 372 mm 17-27/32 x 6-13/16 x 14-21/32 inch
  • Weight: Approx. 18 kg
  • Approx. 39.7lbs
  • Accessories: Turntable, Turntable sheet, Dust cover, EP record adaptor, Balance weight, Auxiliary weight(S), Auxiliary weight(L), Head shell, Overhang gauge, Screw set for cartridge, PHONO cable, PHONO earth lead, AC power supply cord, Screw set for turntable, Owner's Manual

 

Technics Direct Drive Turntables Introduction

 

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