Spendor D7 Speaker System

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Spendor D7 Speaker System

Spendor D7 Speaker System

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Spendor D7 Speaker System

$5,995.00 Free Shipping!

Free Shipping!
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  • Description


    MY TAKE: Pick a speaker, any speaker, and I guarantee you’ll be able to find those who love it and those who hate it. It’s easy to get into trouble when recommending a speaker. The plethora of brands and models multiplied by the vast range of personal references, virtually insure you will offend some and befriend others.

         A very few speakers that I have come across in my thirty years in this business, have possessed the ability to fall into the graces of most all who listen. I’m not exactly sure why, maybe it’s an even handed tonal presentation, maybe it’s low distortion, or possibly a specific frequency response curve. Who knows, maybe all of the above. For whatever reason, there are indeed a very few speakers that seem to be almost universally accepted.

          As you might have guessed by now, I think Spendor fit’s into that exclusive club. Yet more than just being non-offensive, the Spendor’s have a genuinely likeable quality along with some real performance attributes. These designs are well respected for their superb recreation of all things spatial; they do the sound staging thing to a T. Resolution of lo-level detail is sparkling and, above all, a tonal palette that is musically satisfying. Oh yes, they do the rhythm and pace thing too.

           Spendor has been around for thirty-odd years. Founded back in the 1960’s by Spencer and Dorothy Hughes, it grew out of expertise gained in the engineering department of the BBC. The company has designed and marketed a number of outstanding speakers over the years, gaining a worldwide reputation for quality with models like the classic LS3/5.

          In 2001 the company was acquired by Philip Swift, founder of the renowned Audiolab brand, with the intention of modernizing the designs to meet with contemporary expectations. Many of us long-time Spendor fans were apprehensive, feeling that the so-called modernization meant discarding the qualities so prized in their past designs. That turned out not be the case, and Mr. Swift has done an excellent job of melding the past strengths with new innovation. The Spendor “S” Series speakers are an extension of past superb designs; and carry forth the philosophy and performance that have made this brand so popular.

           Spendor's proprietary Linear Flow port technology reduces turbulence thus eliminating "port chuffing," while increasing low frequency linearity. The Spendor drive units feature stiff, light polymer cones with proprietary damping to reduce coloration. The dynamically damped enclosures dramatically reduce cabinet re-radiation levels. 

               Each model delivers a balanced energy output to guarantee a consistent sound and a vivid seamless sound stage in a diversity of living environments. This technology is complemented by elegant modern styling. Whether you listen to music or film, stereo or surround sound, there is a Spendor loudspeaker system to match your individual lifestyle. Each model is calibrated and matched to broadcast reference standards + 1.0dB. - Galen Carol
     


    Spendor D7 -

    The Spendor D7 delivers music with a fresh vibrant realism that conventional loudspeakers cannot match. This new level of performance is the direct result of important Spendor innovations.

    The Spendor LPZ tweeter is built around a stainless steel front plate that forms an acoustic chamber directly in front of the lightweight diaphragm. The phase correcting microfoil equalizes sound wave path lengths while generating a symmettrical pressure environment, isuring the tweeter operates in a balanced linear mode. The D7 mid-bass drive unit has an advanced EP77 polymer cone, whilst the low frequency drive unit uses a bonded Kevlar composite. The latest fifth generation Spendor Linear Flow port features a twin-venturi, tapered baffle element working in harmony with Spendor's proven dynamic damping, asymmetric bracing and rigid plinth mountings.


    REVIEWS:
     

    "There's something about the way the D7 goes about it's business that makes the music magic."

    "I was mightily surprised by with the new Spendor D7, whcih seemed totally at home just centimetres from a rear wall. There wasn't so much as a hint of bass sloppiness, the bass staying taut, supple and decently extended."

    "Ultimately though, choosing a speaker is all about getting the sound thats right for you, and for me the transparency, delicacy of touch and overall musicality - allied to that tidy, well-behaved bass and smooth treble - seals the deal."

    "The result is a speaker that is lovely to listen to, no matter what you throw at it." - Hi Fi Choice


     

    "In my listening room, where once resided my Spendor BC1s, I noticed especially fine treble dispersion and extension, as well as freedom from any harshness. The treble had a crystalline clarity that put the Spendor D7 among the finest speakers I have heard at any price. I noticed this particularly with piano recordings, such as Simone Dinnerstein's Something Almost Being Said, a collection of music by J.S. Bach and Schubert (CD, Sony Masterworks 798943). I've heard Dinnerstein live, and I must say that the D7s brought her sound and her presence into my listening room.

    "Then there's the British pianist Christian Blackshaw. The other day, on BBC 3, I heard a live recital of him playing works by Mozart, Beethoven, and Schubert. I keep replaying it for this week that it remains available for streaming. Exquisite. I looked up his discography and found Vol.1 of his cycle of Mozart's piano sonatas (1, 2, 8, 9, 17), which I heartily recommend (2 CDs, Wigmore Hall Live 61). Few pianists perform so quietly, so sensitively, without regard to creating a sensation. Awe-inspiring. I can hardly wait for the late Schubert sonatas. Blackshaw is now 65. His playing is comparable to that of Sviatoslav Richter, which is to say that it's otherwise incomparable.

    "I turned to the Endellion String Quartet's recording of Schubert's quartets 13 ("Rosamunde") and 14 ("Death and the Maiden"), D.804 and D.810 (CD, Warner Classics 664232). Talk about a work to die for—Schubert was soon to do just that. I like stringed instruments to sound bright and lively, yet full, rich, and sweet at the same time. The D7s delivered, though some might welcome a slightly softer tone. It would be fascinating to compare the D7 with Spendor's Classic SP1/2R2.

    "The cabinet is well braced but has little stuffing, which may account for the tight, controlled bass and the seamless sound. In no way did the bass lag behind. What I found especially rare about the D7, for a relatively small loudspeaker, was its authority, weight, and speed. You could spend far more for a speaker and not get such a fast, highly resolving sound, and such a sweet midrange. As sweet as the speakers in Spendor's Classic line? Comparing them would be a splendid way to spend an afternoon. I turned to more robust, more full-bodied classical fare.

    "Carlo Maria Giulini's cycle of the Brahms symphonies with the Vienna Philharmonic has long been a favorite. His Los Angeles Philharmonic cycle suffers from a mediocre acoustic and muddled recording. Both are on Deutsche Grammophon. The Vienna cycle was briefly available a few years ago as Newton Classics 8802063. See if you can pick up that 4-CD set for around $20. Check Berkshire Record Outlet, where it could be a "Featured Restock!".

    "Listen to the opening bars of Symphony 1 and the way Giulini drives the music home. (I twice heard him conduct the work live.) Few loudspeakers can convey the power without the aid of a pesky subwoofer or two. Or without pooping out. The D7s could, given enough power.

    "But how little power? "I was listening mainly with my Quicksilver Silver 88 tubed monoblocks. There, on a nearby table, I spied my 3.5Wpc wonder, the Sun Audio SV-2A3, also tubed. Why not?

    "The sound was glorious: the life, the space, the resolution. If only there were more power to bring out the Spendor's splendid bass. The sound lacked large-scale dynamics, bottom-end weight and authority. Nice try.

    "Flea-watt amps aside, the D7s didn't seem overly fussy. The bass control was equally firm with the Quicksilvers, as it was with the solid-state Musical Fidelity M6PRX. Through these quite different power amps, the D7s' sound remained, overall, surprisingly consistent.

    "The D7 is a splendid Spendor. One might seriously question the need to spend any more than $6495 for a pair of speakers. Goodness knows, I'm no spendswift. Or spendorthrift." - Sam Tellig, Stereophile

     

    "Spendor S7 review: verdict - We’ve become used to Spendor speakers being carefully developed, but the Spendor D7s take that attention to detail to another level. Spendor has a rich history of making terrific speakers. You can count the D7s among them." - What Hi-Fi - FIVE STAR RATING

     

    FEATURES:
     

    • Fifth generation 'linear flow', twin venturi port
    • New Spendor 18cm drive unit with advanced polymer cone
    • New Spendor LPZ phase-correcting tweeter
    • High grade crossover network with gold conductors
    • Silver plated pure copper internal cables throughout
    • Recessed high quality alloy binding posts on the rear
    • Spendor 'dynamic damping' to minimise cabinet resonances
    • High rigidity stabilizer base plate system for solid floor mounting
    • Premium veneers



    SPECIFICATIONS:
     

    • Description: 2.5-way floor standing loudspeaker
    • Enclosure type: Spendor linear flow reflex with dynamic damping
    • HF drive unit: Spendor 22mm LPZ with fluid cooling
    • MF / LF drive unit: Spendor 180mm ep77 cone
    • LF drive unit: Spendor 180mm Kevlar composite cone
    • Sensitivity: 90dB for 1 watt at 1 metre
    • Crossover point: 900 Hz, 3.2 kHz
    • Typical in-room response: 29 Hz to 25 kHz
    • Impedance: 8 ohms nominal
    • Power handling: 200 watts unclipped programme
    • Terminals: Single pair of recessed precision binding posts
    • Cabinet (HxWxD) 950 x 192 x 320mm (excluding spikes)
    • Standard finishes: black ash, cherry, light oak, dark walnut
    • Premium high gloss finishes: Spendor dark, Spendor white available on special order - Call for pricing
    • Weight: 47 pounds each

     

    Video: How Spendor Speakers Are Made

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Spendor D7 Speaker System

$5,995.00 Free Shipping!

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Description


MY TAKE: Pick a speaker, any speaker, and I guarantee you’ll be able to find those who love it and those who hate it. It’s easy to get into trouble when recommending a speaker. The plethora of brands and models multiplied by the vast range of personal references, virtually insure you will offend some and befriend others.

     A very few speakers that I have come across in my thirty years in this business, have possessed the ability to fall into the graces of most all who listen. I’m not exactly sure why, maybe it’s an even handed tonal presentation, maybe it’s low distortion, or possibly a specific frequency response curve. Who knows, maybe all of the above. For whatever reason, there are indeed a very few speakers that seem to be almost universally accepted.

      As you might have guessed by now, I think Spendor fit’s into that exclusive club. Yet more than just being non-offensive, the Spendor’s have a genuinely likeable quality along with some real performance attributes. These designs are well respected for their superb recreation of all things spatial; they do the sound staging thing to a T. Resolution of lo-level detail is sparkling and, above all, a tonal palette that is musically satisfying. Oh yes, they do the rhythm and pace thing too.

       Spendor has been around for thirty-odd years. Founded back in the 1960’s by Spencer and Dorothy Hughes, it grew out of expertise gained in the engineering department of the BBC. The company has designed and marketed a number of outstanding speakers over the years, gaining a worldwide reputation for quality with models like the classic LS3/5.

      In 2001 the company was acquired by Philip Swift, founder of the renowned Audiolab brand, with the intention of modernizing the designs to meet with contemporary expectations. Many of us long-time Spendor fans were apprehensive, feeling that the so-called modernization meant discarding the qualities so prized in their past designs. That turned out not be the case, and Mr. Swift has done an excellent job of melding the past strengths with new innovation. The Spendor “S” Series speakers are an extension of past superb designs; and carry forth the philosophy and performance that have made this brand so popular.

       Spendor's proprietary Linear Flow port technology reduces turbulence thus eliminating "port chuffing," while increasing low frequency linearity. The Spendor drive units feature stiff, light polymer cones with proprietary damping to reduce coloration. The dynamically damped enclosures dramatically reduce cabinet re-radiation levels. 

           Each model delivers a balanced energy output to guarantee a consistent sound and a vivid seamless sound stage in a diversity of living environments. This technology is complemented by elegant modern styling. Whether you listen to music or film, stereo or surround sound, there is a Spendor loudspeaker system to match your individual lifestyle. Each model is calibrated and matched to broadcast reference standards + 1.0dB. - Galen Carol
 


Spendor D7 -

The Spendor D7 delivers music with a fresh vibrant realism that conventional loudspeakers cannot match. This new level of performance is the direct result of important Spendor innovations.

The Spendor LPZ tweeter is built around a stainless steel front plate that forms an acoustic chamber directly in front of the lightweight diaphragm. The phase correcting microfoil equalizes sound wave path lengths while generating a symmettrical pressure environment, isuring the tweeter operates in a balanced linear mode. The D7 mid-bass drive unit has an advanced EP77 polymer cone, whilst the low frequency drive unit uses a bonded Kevlar composite. The latest fifth generation Spendor Linear Flow port features a twin-venturi, tapered baffle element working in harmony with Spendor's proven dynamic damping, asymmetric bracing and rigid plinth mountings.


REVIEWS:
 

"There's something about the way the D7 goes about it's business that makes the music magic."

"I was mightily surprised by with the new Spendor D7, whcih seemed totally at home just centimetres from a rear wall. There wasn't so much as a hint of bass sloppiness, the bass staying taut, supple and decently extended."

"Ultimately though, choosing a speaker is all about getting the sound thats right for you, and for me the transparency, delicacy of touch and overall musicality - allied to that tidy, well-behaved bass and smooth treble - seals the deal."

"The result is a speaker that is lovely to listen to, no matter what you throw at it." - Hi Fi Choice


 

"In my listening room, where once resided my Spendor BC1s, I noticed especially fine treble dispersion and extension, as well as freedom from any harshness. The treble had a crystalline clarity that put the Spendor D7 among the finest speakers I have heard at any price. I noticed this particularly with piano recordings, such as Simone Dinnerstein's Something Almost Being Said, a collection of music by J.S. Bach and Schubert (CD, Sony Masterworks 798943). I've heard Dinnerstein live, and I must say that the D7s brought her sound and her presence into my listening room.

"Then there's the British pianist Christian Blackshaw. The other day, on BBC 3, I heard a live recital of him playing works by Mozart, Beethoven, and Schubert. I keep replaying it for this week that it remains available for streaming. Exquisite. I looked up his discography and found Vol.1 of his cycle of Mozart's piano sonatas (1, 2, 8, 9, 17), which I heartily recommend (2 CDs, Wigmore Hall Live 61). Few pianists perform so quietly, so sensitively, without regard to creating a sensation. Awe-inspiring. I can hardly wait for the late Schubert sonatas. Blackshaw is now 65. His playing is comparable to that of Sviatoslav Richter, which is to say that it's otherwise incomparable.

"I turned to the Endellion String Quartet's recording of Schubert's quartets 13 ("Rosamunde") and 14 ("Death and the Maiden"), D.804 and D.810 (CD, Warner Classics 664232). Talk about a work to die for—Schubert was soon to do just that. I like stringed instruments to sound bright and lively, yet full, rich, and sweet at the same time. The D7s delivered, though some might welcome a slightly softer tone. It would be fascinating to compare the D7 with Spendor's Classic SP1/2R2.

"The cabinet is well braced but has little stuffing, which may account for the tight, controlled bass and the seamless sound. In no way did the bass lag behind. What I found especially rare about the D7, for a relatively small loudspeaker, was its authority, weight, and speed. You could spend far more for a speaker and not get such a fast, highly resolving sound, and such a sweet midrange. As sweet as the speakers in Spendor's Classic line? Comparing them would be a splendid way to spend an afternoon. I turned to more robust, more full-bodied classical fare.

"Carlo Maria Giulini's cycle of the Brahms symphonies with the Vienna Philharmonic has long been a favorite. His Los Angeles Philharmonic cycle suffers from a mediocre acoustic and muddled recording. Both are on Deutsche Grammophon. The Vienna cycle was briefly available a few years ago as Newton Classics 8802063. See if you can pick up that 4-CD set for around $20. Check Berkshire Record Outlet, where it could be a "Featured Restock!".

"Listen to the opening bars of Symphony 1 and the way Giulini drives the music home. (I twice heard him conduct the work live.) Few loudspeakers can convey the power without the aid of a pesky subwoofer or two. Or without pooping out. The D7s could, given enough power.

"But how little power? "I was listening mainly with my Quicksilver Silver 88 tubed monoblocks. There, on a nearby table, I spied my 3.5Wpc wonder, the Sun Audio SV-2A3, also tubed. Why not?

"The sound was glorious: the life, the space, the resolution. If only there were more power to bring out the Spendor's splendid bass. The sound lacked large-scale dynamics, bottom-end weight and authority. Nice try.

"Flea-watt amps aside, the D7s didn't seem overly fussy. The bass control was equally firm with the Quicksilvers, as it was with the solid-state Musical Fidelity M6PRX. Through these quite different power amps, the D7s' sound remained, overall, surprisingly consistent.

"The D7 is a splendid Spendor. One might seriously question the need to spend any more than $6495 for a pair of speakers. Goodness knows, I'm no spendswift. Or spendorthrift." - Sam Tellig, Stereophile

 

"Spendor S7 review: verdict - We’ve become used to Spendor speakers being carefully developed, but the Spendor D7s take that attention to detail to another level. Spendor has a rich history of making terrific speakers. You can count the D7s among them." - What Hi-Fi - FIVE STAR RATING

 

FEATURES:
 

  • Fifth generation 'linear flow', twin venturi port
  • New Spendor 18cm drive unit with advanced polymer cone
  • New Spendor LPZ phase-correcting tweeter
  • High grade crossover network with gold conductors
  • Silver plated pure copper internal cables throughout
  • Recessed high quality alloy binding posts on the rear
  • Spendor 'dynamic damping' to minimise cabinet resonances
  • High rigidity stabilizer base plate system for solid floor mounting
  • Premium veneers



SPECIFICATIONS:
 

  • Description: 2.5-way floor standing loudspeaker
  • Enclosure type: Spendor linear flow reflex with dynamic damping
  • HF drive unit: Spendor 22mm LPZ with fluid cooling
  • MF / LF drive unit: Spendor 180mm ep77 cone
  • LF drive unit: Spendor 180mm Kevlar composite cone
  • Sensitivity: 90dB for 1 watt at 1 metre
  • Crossover point: 900 Hz, 3.2 kHz
  • Typical in-room response: 29 Hz to 25 kHz
  • Impedance: 8 ohms nominal
  • Power handling: 200 watts unclipped programme
  • Terminals: Single pair of recessed precision binding posts
  • Cabinet (HxWxD) 950 x 192 x 320mm (excluding spikes)
  • Standard finishes: black ash, cherry, light oak, dark walnut
  • Premium high gloss finishes: Spendor dark, Spendor white available on special order - Call for pricing
  • Weight: 47 pounds each

 

Video: How Spendor Speakers Are Made